Friday, April 28, 2017

Lunch, Rattlers, Bowling,

For my Red Lobster lunch I had Crispy Shrimp Lettuce Wraps. It was delicious but they provide you with a hunk of lettuce and it is almost impossible to wrap the shrimp in a lettuce leaf at the table. I just ended up chomping a lettuce leaf with every mouthful. It is sweet and spicy and just to add to it they slice up a few green chilles on top. My mouth was on fire at the end. Spicey coffee was what I felt as though I was drinking LOL.

I just read this on How to Geek. Rattlesnakes survive cold winters by entering a hibernation-like (dormant) state known as “brumation” where they gather in large numbers, sometimes upwards of a thousand snakes, in large underground “rattlesnake dens” or hibernacula. What a horrid thought. Sorry, if I found one of those hibernacula, I would be doing what I could to exterminate them. Save the whales, not the snakes!!! I guess there is a niche for them and I shouldn't want to get rid of them, but a thousand at one time, yuk.

Had fun at the Travel League today. Didn't bowl particularly well but it doesn't matter we are just there for enjoyment. Was nice to see most of the people whom we haven't seen in a while. Matt had one really good game today too. Somebody said it was because he wasn't bowling with me LOL.

I saw this recipe and figured it was right up my street.

Red Cabbage, Bacon, and Avocado Slaw With Balsamic Vinaigrette


FOR THE BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE

2 garlic cloves, minced
1 Tbs Dijon mustard
1 Tbs honey
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
0.33 cup olive oil
kosher salt

FOR THE SALAD

1 small head red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
4 slices uncured bacon, cooked until crisp, drained and chopped
0.5 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
4 large radishes, thinly sliced
3 green onions, thinly sliced
kosher salt
1 large avocado, pitted, peeled, and cut into chunks

1. To make the balsamic vinaigrette: In a blender, combine the garlic, mustard, honey, vinegar, and olive oil. Blend until smooth and creamy. Season with salt and set aside.

2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, bacon, and parsley. Drizzle with a few tablespoons of the vinaigrette to start (you can always add more!) and toss to coat.

3. Add the radishes and green onion and toss again. Season with salt.

4. Transfer to a serving platter and top with the avocado.

Source: Taste

Have a great day
 

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Cooking, Travel League

Wednesday I stripped a bought rotisserie chicken (we had had one meal) and then made my Leftover Chicken recipe - can be made with turkey and one can add ham. It is delicious and we both enjoy it. The original recipe was from Paul Holiday a British chef who actually made a pie with this filling but as I am not really into pastry, either making or eating it, I adapted it. I now buy a rotisserie chicken specifically to have one meal and then make this recipe. We also had Italian sausage and peppers for supper so by the evening I was a tad knackered. It seems I have never posted this recipe so I should do so.

Today we are having lunch at the Red Lobster with the members of the Travel League. We are then bowling with them at our regular alley. First time we have joined them for ages. Decided we didn't want to travel out of town in the winter. We then missed the one last month, which was local, because I was having teeth pulled or filled or something.

Salted candies, whether chocolate or caramel, have become very much the "thing" these days. Here is a torte which makes use of them. Of course we don't have double cream here. We can get Carnation Caramel at Amazon.ca if nowhere else. The salted caramels are available in grocery stores in the UK so I imagine they will be available here.

Salted Caramel Chocolate Torte

Indulge guests at your next party with this impressive dessert. A touch of salt really sets off the
caramel and dark chocolate

175 g digestive biscuits
85 g butter, melted
397 g can caramel (we used Carnation caramel)
1 tsp sea salt, plus extra to serve
300 g plain chocolate (70% solids), broken into chunks
600 ml tub double cream
25 g icing sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
salted caramel chocolates, to decorate
single cream, to serve (optional)

1. Line the base of a deep, round 20 cm loose-bottomed cake tin with a circle of baking parchment. Line the sides with one long strip that comes just above the sides of the tin – staple or paper clip where the strip overlaps to hold it in place.

2. Crush the biscuits in a plastic bag or bowl with the end of a rolling pin. Stir into the melted butter, then evenly press into the bottom of the tin. Chill for 10 mins.

3. Reserve 2 tbsp of the caramel. Stir the sea salt into the remainder and spoon into the centre of the biscuit base. Gently spread so the base is evenly covered but a visible 1-2cm border of biscuit remains around the edge. Chill for 20 mins while you make the chocolate layer.

4. Gently melt the chocolate in a large heatproof bowl over a pan of barely simmering water. Stir 1 tbsp of the cream into the reserved caramel, then cover and chill until ready to decorate. Once the chocolate has melted, turn off the heat but leave the bowl where it is, and gradually stir in the remaining cream until you have a smooth, shiny, thick chocolate sauce. Sift in the icing sugar and stir in with the vanilla extract. Lift off the heat and let the mixture cool for 10 mins.

5. Ladle or pour the chocolate mixture around the edge of the torte first, so it fills the biscuit border, sealing the caramel in the centre. Then ladle or pour in the rest and gently shake to smooth the surface. Chill for at least 5 hrs or up to 24 hours until firm.

6. Remove the torte from the tin, then carefully peel off the strip of paper and transfer to a serving plate. Dot the chocolates on top. Spoon the reserved caramel-cream mixture into a small food or freezer bag. Snip off the tiniest tip of the corner to make a very small opening, then squiggle lines of caramel over the top. Chill until ready to serve. Scatter with a pinch or two of sea salt before serving, then thinly slice. Eat with a drizzle of single cream, if you like.

7. Line the base of a deep, round 20cm loose-bottomed cake tin with a circle of baking parchment. Line the sides with one long strip that comes just above the sides of the tin – staple or paper clip where the strip overlaps to hold it in place.

8. Crush the biscuits in a plastic bag or bowl with the end of a rolling pin. Stir into the melted butter, then evenly press into the bottom of the tin. Chill for 10 mins.

9. Reserve 2 tbsp of the caramel. Stir the sea salt into the remainder and spoon into the centre of the biscuit base. Gently spread so the base is evenly covered but a visible 1-2cm border of biscuit remains around the edge. Chill for 20 mins while you make the chocolate layer.

10. Gently melt the chocolate in a large heatproof bowl over a pan of barely simmering water. Stir 1 tbsp of the cream into the reserved caramel, then cover and chill until ready to decorate. Once the chocolate has melted, turn off the heat but leave the bowl where it is, and gradually stir in the remaining cream until you have a smooth, shiny, thick chocolate sauce. Sift in the icing sugar and stir in with the vanilla extract. Lift off the heat and let the mixture cool for 10 mins.

11. Ladle or pour the chocolate mixture around the edge of the torte first, so it fills the biscuit border, sealing the caramel in the centre. Then ladle or pour in the rest and gently shake to smooth the surface. Chill for at least 5 hrs or up to 24 hours until firm.

12. Remove the torte from the tin, then carefully peel off the strip of paper and transfer to a serving plate. Dot the chocolates on top. Spoon the reserved caramel-cream mixture into a small food or freezer bag. Snip off the tiniest tip of the corner to make a very small opening, then squiggle lines of caramel over the top. Chill until ready to serve. Scatter with a pinch or two of sea salt before serving, then thinly slice. Eat with a drizzle of single cream, if you like.

13. Line the base of a deep, round 20cm loose-bottomed cake tin with a circle of baking parchment. Line the sides with one long strip that comes just above the sides of the tin – staple or paper clip where the strip overlaps to hold it in place.

14. Crush the biscuits in a plastic bag or bowl with the end of a rolling pin. Stir into the melted butter, then evenly press into the bottom of the tin. Chill for 10 mins.

15. Reserve 2 tbsp of the caramel. Stir the sea salt into the remainder and spoon into the centre of the biscuit base. Gently spread so the base is evenly covered but a visible 1-2cm border of biscuit remains around the edge. Chill for 20 mins while you make the chocolate layer.

16. Gently melt the chocolate in a large heatproof bowl over a pan of barely simmering water. Stir 1 tbsp of the cream into the reserved caramel, then cover and chill until ready to decorate. Once the chocolate has melted, turn off the heat but leave the bowl where it is, and gradually stir in the remaining cream until you have a smooth, shiny, thick chocolate sauce. Sift in the icing sugar and stir in with the vanilla extract. Lift off the heat and let the mixture cool for 10 mins.

17. Ladle or pour the chocolate mixture around the edge of the torte first, so it fills the biscuit border, sealing the caramel in the centre. Then ladle or pour in the rest and gently shake to smooth the surface. Chill for at least 5 hrs or up to 24 hours until firm.

18. Remove the torte from the tin, then carefully peel off the strip of paper and transfer to a serving plate. Dot the chocolates on top. Spoon the reserved caramel-cream mixture into a small food or freezer bag. Snip off the tiniest tip of the corner to make a very small opening, then squiggle lines of caramel over the top. Chill until ready to serve. Scatter with a pinch or two of sea salt before serving, then thinly slice. Eat with a drizzle of single cream, if you like.

Servings: 8

Source: BBC Good Food

Have a great day